duresses

duress

[doo-res, dyoo-, door-is, dyoor-]
noun
1.
compulsion by threat or force; coercion; constraint.
2.
Law. such constraint or coercion as will render void a contract or other legal act entered or performed under its influence.
3.
forcible restraint, especially imprisonment.

Origin:
1275–1325; Middle English duresse < Middle French duresse, -esce, -ece < Latin dūritia hardness, harshness, oppression, equivalent to dūr(us) hard + -itia -ice


1. intimidation, pressure, bullying, browbeating.
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World English Dictionary
duress (djʊˈrɛs, djʊə-)
 
n
1.  compulsion by use of force or threat; constraint; coercion (often in the phrase under duress)
2.  law the illegal exercise of coercion
3.  confinement; imprisonment
 
[C14: from Old French duresse, from Latin dūritia hardness, from dūrus hard]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Word Origin & History

duress
c.1320, "harsh or severe treatment," from O.Fr. duresse, from L. duritia "hardness," from durus "hard" (see endure). Sense of "forcible restraint" is from c.1430; that of "coercion" is from 1596.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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