dwarf

[dwawrf]
noun, plural dwarfs, dwarves.
1.
a person of abnormally small stature owing to a pathological condition, especially one suffering from cretinism or some other disease that produces disproportion or deformation of features and limbs.
2.
an animal or plant much smaller than the average of its kind or species.
3.
(in folklore) a being in the form of a small, often misshapen and ugly, man, usually having magic powers.
4.
Astronomy, dwarf star.
adjective
5.
of unusually small stature or size; diminutive.
verb (used with object)
6.
to cause to appear or seem small in size, extent, character, etc., as by being much larger or better: He dwarfed all his rivals in athletic ability.
7.
to make dwarf or dwarfish; prevent the due development of.
verb (used without object)
8.
to become stunted or smaller.

Origin:
before 900; Middle English dwerf, Old English dweorh; replacing Middle English dwerg, Old English dweorg; cognate with Old High German twerg, Old Norse dvergr

dwarflike, adjective
dwarfness, noun
undwarfed, adjective


1. Dwarf, midget, pygmy are terms for a very small person. A dwarf is someone checked in growth or stunted, or in some way not normally formed. A midget (not in technical use) is someone perfect in form and normal in function, but diminutive. A pygmy is properly a member of one of certain small-sized peoples of Africa and Asia, but the word is often used imprecisely to mean dwarf or midget. Dwarf is a term often used to describe very small plants. Pygmy is used to describe very small animals. 2. runt, miniature.


1, 5. giant.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
dwarf (dwɔːf)
 
n , pl dwarfs, dwarves
1.  Compare midget an abnormally undersized person, esp one with a large head and short arms and legs
2.  a.  an animal or plant much below the average height for the species
 b.  (as modifier): a dwarf tree
3.  (in folklore) a small ugly manlike creature, often possessing magical powers
4.  astronomy short for dwarf star
 
vb
5.  to become or cause to become comparatively small in size, importance, etc
6.  (tr) to stunt the growth of
 
[Old English dweorg; related to Old Norse dvergr, Old High German twerc]
 
'dwarfish
 
adj
 
'dwarfishly
 
adv
 
'dwarfishness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

dwarf
O.E. dweorh, from P.Gmc. *dweraz, from PIE *dhwergwhos "something tiny." The mythological sense is from Ger., 1770. The verb meaning "to render dwarfish" is from 1620s; that of "to cause to look small" is from 1850. Related: Dwarfed; dwarfing. The shift of the O.E. guttural at the end of the word to
modern -f is typical (cf. enough, draft). O.E. plural dweorgas became M.E. dwarrows, later leveled down to dwarfs. The use of dwarves for the legendary race was popularized by J.R.R. Tolkien.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

dwarf (dwôrf)
n. pl. dwarfs or dwarves (dwôrvz)
An abnormally small person, often having limbs and features not properly proportioned or formed.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
dwarf   (dwôrf)  Pronunciation Key 
  1. An abnormally small person, often having limbs and features atypically proportioned or formed.

  2. An atypically small animal or plant.

  3. A dwarf star or dwarf galaxy.


The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Dwarf definition


a lean or emaciated person (Lev. 21:20).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Example sentences
The problem of higher ed salaries is dwarfed by the top salaries in
  corporations.
We can not permit ourselves to be narrowed and dwarfed by slogans and phrases.
Their initial findings hinted that dark stars would have dwarfed regular stars.
But all these doses are dwarfed in comparison with natural radiation doses in
  some parts of the world.
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