dynamite

[dahy-nuh-mahyt]
noun
1.
a high explosive, originally consisting of nitroglycerin mixed with an absorbent substance, now with ammonium nitrate usually replacing the nitroglycerin.
2.
any person or thing having a spectacular effect.
verb (used with object), dynamited, dynamiting.
3.
to blow up, shatter, or destroy with dynamite: Saboteurs dynamited the dam.
4.
to mine or charge with dynamite.
adjective
5.
Informal. creating a spectacular or optimum effect; great; topnotch: a dynamite idea; a dynamite crew.

Origin:
1867; < Swedish dynamit, introduced by A. B. Nobel, its inventor; see dyna(m)-, -ite1

dynamiter, noun
dynamitic [dahy-nuh-mit-ik] , adjective
dynamitically, adverb
undynamited, adjective
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
dynamite (ˈdaɪnəˌmaɪt)
 
n
1.  an explosive consisting of nitroglycerine or ammonium nitrate mixed with kieselguhr, sawdust, or wood pulp
2.  informal a spectacular or potentially dangerous person or thing
 
vb
3.  (tr) to mine or blow up with dynamite
 
[C19 (coined by Alfred Nobel): from dynamo- + -ite1]
 
'dynamiter
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

dynamite
1867, from Sw. dynamit, coined 1867 by its inventor, Sw. chemist Alfred Nobel (1833-96), from Gk. dynamis "power." Fig. sense of "something potentially dangerous" is from 1922.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
dynamite   (dī'nə-mīt')  Pronunciation Key 
A powerful explosive used in blasting and mining. It typically consists of nitroglycerin and a nitrate (especially sodium nitrate or ammonium nitrate), combined with an absorbent material that makes it safer to handle.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Example sentences
They blew open the express car with dynamite and fired several shots at the
  trainmen, who attempted to escape.
The mountain rock is soft enough for the drill to do its work without dynamite.
Bees could be trained, through altered feeding habits, to swarm a vehicle
  packed with dynamite.
There's a smoked version that's dynamite for this guacamole.
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