e e hale

Hale

[heyl]
noun
1.
Edward Everett, 1822–1909, U.S. clergyman and author.
2.
George Ellery [el-uh-ree] , 1868–1938, U.S. astronomer.
3.
Sir Matthew, 1609–76, British jurist: Lord Chief justice 1671–76.
4.
Nathan, 1755–76, American soldier hanged as a spy by the British during the american revolution.
5.
Sarah Josepha [joh-see-fuh] , 1788–1879, U.S. editor and author.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
hale1 (heɪl)
 
adj
1.  healthy and robust (esp in the phrase hale and hearty)
2.  dialect (Scot), (Northern English) whole
 
[Old English hælwhole]
 
'haleness1
 
n

hale2 (heɪl)
 
vb
(tr) to pull or drag; haul
 
[C13: from Old French haler, of Germanic origin; compare Old High German halōn to fetch, Old English geholian to acquire]
 
'haler2
 
n

Hale (heɪl)
 
n
1.  George Ellery. 1868--1938, US astronomer: undertook research into sunspots and invented the spectroheliograph
2.  Sir Matthew. 1609--76, English judge and scholar; Lord Chief Justice (1671--76)

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

hale
"healthy," O.E. hal "healthy" (see health). The Scottish and northern English form of whole, it was given a literary sense of "free from infirmity" (1734).

hale
"drag, summon," c.1200, from O.Fr. haler "to pull, haul," from Frankish *halon or O.Du. halen, both from P.Gmc.; probably also from O.E. geholian "obtain" (see haul).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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