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edict

[ee-dikt] /ˈi dɪkt/
noun
1.
a decree issued by a sovereign or other authority.
Synonyms: dictum, pronouncement.
2.
any authoritative proclamation or command.
Origin
1250-1300
1250-1300; Middle English < Latin ēdictum, noun use of neuter of ēdictus (past participle of ēdīcere to say out), equivalent to ē- e-1 + dictus said; see dictum
Related forms
edictal, adjective
edictally, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for edict
  • Willy defiantly flouts every edict to prove her wrong.
  • Arthur vocally resisted the edict.
  • Its not all about drawing a line in the sand and blindly following an edict.
  • The arguments concerning this federal edict have been many and heated.
  • His fellow prisoners are fatalists, who regard their peonage to a local landowner as a sort of edict of God.
  • When boundaries in the search for truth are established by authoritarian edict there is bound to be ideological bias.
  • There, by ancient edict, all wild swans belong to the queen.
  • This edict, however, has been subject to certain exceptions.
  • When you rule the world, you can issue that edict.
  • The edict also called for stabilizing prices on medical services and for certain agricultural fertilizers.
British Dictionary definitions for edict

edict

/ˈiːdɪkt/
noun
1.
a decree, order, or ordinance issued by a sovereign, state, or any other holder of authority
2.
any formal or authoritative command, proclamation, etc
Derived Forms
edictal, adjective
edictally, adverb
Word Origin
C15: from Latin ēdictum, from ēdīcere to declare
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for edict
n.

late 15c., edycte; earlier edit, late 13c., "proclamation having the force of law," from Old French edit, from Latin edictum "proclamation, ordinance, edict," neuter past participle of edicere "publish, proclaim," from e- "out" (see ex-) + dicere "to say" (see diction).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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