edictal

edict

[ee-dikt]
noun
1.
a decree issued by a sovereign or other authority. dictum, pronouncement.
2.
any authoritative proclamation or command.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English < Latin ēdictum, noun use of neuter of ēdictus (past participle of ēdīcere to say out), equivalent to ē- e-1 + dictus said; see dictum

edictal, adjective
edictally, adverb
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World English Dictionary
edict (ˈiːdɪkt)
 
n
1.  a decree, order, or ordinance issued by a sovereign, state, or any other holder of authority
2.  any formal or authoritative command, proclamation, etc
 
[C15: from Latin ēdictum, from ēdīcere to declare]
 
e'dictal
 
adj
 
e'dictally
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin & History

edict
c.1300, "proclamation having the force of law," from L. edictum, neut. pp. of edicere "publish, proclaim," from e- "out" + dicere "to say" (see diction).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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