edict

[ee-dikt]
noun
1.
a decree issued by a sovereign or other authority. dictum, pronouncement.
2.
any authoritative proclamation or command.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English < Latin ēdictum, noun use of neuter of ēdictus (past participle of ēdīcere to say out), equivalent to ē- e-1 + dictus said; see dictum

edictal, adjective
edictally, adverb
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World English Dictionary
edict (ˈiːdɪkt)
 
n
1.  a decree, order, or ordinance issued by a sovereign, state, or any other holder of authority
2.  any formal or authoritative command, proclamation, etc
 
[C15: from Latin ēdictum, from ēdīcere to declare]
 
e'dictal
 
adj
 
e'dictally
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

edict
c.1300, "proclamation having the force of law," from L. edictum, neut. pp. of edicere "publish, proclaim," from e- "out" + dicere "to say" (see diction).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Edicts can't generate a conservation ethic, however.
But under the influence of courtiers who opposed the costly voyages, one of his
  first edicts was to halt all overseas expeditions.
History shows us time and again that edicts and bans simply do not work.
But then the people who ignore those edicts and survive to tell the tale are
  lauded as heroes.
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