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edict

[ee-dikt] /ˈi dɪkt/
noun
1.
a decree issued by a sovereign or other authority.
Synonyms: dictum, pronouncement.
2.
any authoritative proclamation or command.
Origin
1250-1300
1250-1300; Middle English < Latin ēdictum, noun use of neuter of ēdictus (past participle of ēdīcere to say out), equivalent to ē- e-1 + dictus said; see dictum
Related forms
edictal, adjective
edictally, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for edicts
  • edicts can't generate a conservation ethic, however.
  • But under the influence of courtiers who opposed the costly voyages, one of his first edicts was to halt all overseas expeditions.
  • History shows us time and again that edicts and bans simply do not work.
  • But then the people who ignore those edicts and survive to tell the tale are lauded as heroes.
  • After which they were again brought before the governor, who asked them if they would at length obey the edicts of the emperors.
  • edicts were sent out to the blue-collar workforce whom they rarely met face-to-face.
  • The police gets involved in unlawful raids under the pretense of non-existent edicts or non-applicable clauses.
  • It remains unclear whether there were explicit edicts along these lines in reference to archaeological sites.
  • Faith will survive, and true faith will be strengthened rather than diminished by giving everyone freedom from their edicts.
  • The research procedure employed was to determine what governmental edicts have an impact on fire prevention inspection activities.
British Dictionary definitions for edicts

edict

/ˈiːdɪkt/
noun
1.
a decree, order, or ordinance issued by a sovereign, state, or any other holder of authority
2.
any formal or authoritative command, proclamation, etc
Derived Forms
edictal, adjective
edictally, adverb
Word Origin
C15: from Latin ēdictum, from ēdīcere to declare
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for edicts

edict

n.

late 15c., edycte; earlier edit, late 13c., "proclamation having the force of law," from Old French edit, from Latin edictum "proclamation, ordinance, edict," neuter past participle of edicere "publish, proclaim," from e- "out" (see ex-) + dicere "to say" (see diction).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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