edifice

[ed-uh-fis]
noun
1.
a building, especially one of large size or imposing appearance.
2.
any large, complex system or organization.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English < Anglo-French, Middle French < Latin aedificium, equivalent to aedific(āre) to build (see edify) + -ium -ium

edificial [ed-uh-fish-uhl] , adjective
unedificial, adjective


1. See building.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
edifice (ˈɛdɪfɪs)
 
n
1.  a building, esp a large or imposing one
2.  a complex or elaborate institution or organization
 
[C14: from Old French, from Latin aedificium, from aedificāre to build; see edify]
 
edificial
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

edifice
late 14c., from O.Fr. edifice "building," from L. ædificium "building," from ædificare "to build," from ædis, variant of ædes "temple," in the pl. meaning "dwelling, building," originally "hearth" + the root of facere "to make" (see factitious).
ædis is from I.E. base *aidh- "to burn" (cf. Gk. aithein "to burn," Skt. inddhe "burst into flames," O.Ir. aed "fire").
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
He also erected hundreds of new churches, libraries and public edifices
  throughout the empire.
Once peoples have permanent housing these edifices will be used for the
  warehousing of products and goods of the revived nation.
But some of these hallowed edifices are crumbling and in desperate need of
  repair.
He used the money to build great edifices on the bones of his workers.
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