effectual

[ih-fek-choo-uhl]
adjective
1.
producing or capable of producing an intended effect; adequate.
2.
valid or binding, as an agreement or document.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English effectuel (< AF), late Middle English effectual < Medieval Latin effectuālis, equivalent to Latin effectu-, stem of effectus effect + -ālis -al1

effectually, adverb
effectualness, effectuality, noun
preeffectual, adjective
preeffectually, adverb


1. See effective.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
effectual (ɪˈfɛktjʊəl)
 
adj
1.  capable of or successful in producing an intended result; effective
2.  (of documents, agreements, etc) having legal force
 
effectu'ality
 
n
 
ef'fectualness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

effectual
late 14c., O.Fr. effectuel, from L.L. effectualis, from effectus (see effect). Related: Effectually.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Of course, he is strongwilled and effectual mainly in the pursuit of his own interest.
Entrepreneurs are often good at effectual reasoning.
Early indications suggest the rookie company founders are spread all across the effectual-to-causal scale.
Yet for effectual change, significant shifts in pedagogy prove more powerful than surface additions.
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