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Denotation vs. Connotation

eldress

[el-dris] /ˈɛl drɪs/
noun
1.
a laywoman who is a governing officer in certain Protestant churches.
Origin of eldress
1630-1640
1630-40; elder1 + -ess
Usage note
See -ess.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for eldress
Historical Examples
  • eldress Abby bowed, but she looked weak and stricken and old.

    Susanna and Sue Kate Douglas Wiggin
  • "It's getting late, eldress," one of them said, and glanced at the clock.

    The Way to Peace Margaret Deland
  • She then went through the action of handing the articles to the eldress, at the same time mentioning what they were, and for whom.

    History of American Socialisms John Humphrey Noyes
  • "eldress asked me to bring your mail down to you, Brother Lewis," she said.

    The Way to Peace Margaret Deland
  • In January, when the eldress fell ill, Athalia was especially useful.

    The Way to Peace Margaret Deland
  • Oh, eldress Abby, they've come back to me all day, those words.

    Susanna and Sue Kate Douglas Wiggin
  • The voice of eldress Abby pursued Hetty in her flight like the voice in a dream.

    Susanna and Sue Kate Douglas Wiggin
  • Athalia listened breathlessly, her rapt, unhumorous eyes fixed on eldress Hannah's still face.

    The Way to Peace Margaret Deland
  • "Athalia's capable," eldress Hannah said, and the other sisters said "Yee," and smiled at one another.

    The Way to Peace Margaret Deland
  • It took Athalia a perceptible minute to get herself in hand sufficiently to say, meekly, "Yee, eldress."

    The Way to Peace Margaret Deland

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