elicit

[ih-lis-it]
verb (used with object)
to draw or bring out or forth; educe; evoke: to elicit the truth; to elicit a response with a question.

Origin:
1635–45; < Latin ēlicitus drawn out (past participle of ēlicere), equivalent to ē- e-1 + lici- draw, lure + -tus past participle suffix

elicitation, noun
elicitor, noun
nonelicited, adjective
unelicited, adjective

elicit, illicit.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
elicit (ɪˈlɪsɪt)
 
vb
1.  to give rise to; evoke: to elicit a sharp retort
2.  to bring to light: to elicit the truth
 
[C17: from Latin ēlicere to lure forth, from licere to entice]
 
e'licitable
 
adj
 
elici'tation
 
n
 
e'licitor
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

elicit
1620s, from L. elicitus, pp. of elicere "draw forth," from ex- "out" + -licere, comb. form of lacere "to entice." Related: Elicited; eliciting; elicits.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Apparently she is entering into his delusion, whose whole range she elicits
  from him, without once opposing him.
That's probably what makes his humor unique and why it elicits cringes as
  regularly as laughs.
Mentioning this in the company of higher education's official representatives,
  of course, elicits indignation.
Not exactly rare anymore, it still elicits a nostalgic pang of delight when
  discovered.
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