eliding

elide

[ih-lahyd]
verb (used with object), elided, eliding.
1.
to omit (a vowel, consonant, or syllable) in pronunciation.
2.
to suppress; omit; ignore; pass over.
3.
Law. to annul or quash.

Origin:
1585–95; < Latin ēlīdere to strike out, equivalent to ē- e-1 + -līdere, combining form of laedere to wound

unelided, adjective
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World English Dictionary
elide (ɪˈlaɪd)
 
vb
phonetics to undergo or cause to undergo elision
 
[C16: from Latin ēlīdere to knock, from laedere to hit, wound]
 
e'lidible
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Word Origin & History

elide
1590s, a legal term, "to annul, do away with," from M.Fr. elider, from L. elidere "strike out," from ex- "out" + -lidere, comb. form of laedere "to strike." Phonological sense is first recorded 1796. Related: Elided; eliding.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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