embrace

1 [em-breys]
verb (used with object), embraced, embracing.
1.
to take or clasp in the arms; press to the bosom; hug.
2.
to take or receive gladly or eagerly; accept willingly: to embrace an idea.
3.
to avail oneself of: to embrace an opportunity.
4.
to adopt (a profession, a religion, etc.): to embrace Buddhism.
5.
to take in with the eye or the mind.
6.
to encircle; surround; enclose.
7.
to include or contain: An encyclopedia embraces a great number of subjects.
verb (used without object), embraced, embracing.
8.
to join in an embrace.
noun
9.
an act or instance of embracing.

Origin:
1300–50; Middle English < Anglo-French, Old French embracier, equivalent to em- em-1 + bracier to embrace, derivative of brace the two arms; see brace

embraceable, adjective
embracement, noun
embracer, noun
unembraceable, adjective


2. adopt, espouse, welcome. 3. seize. 7. comprise, cover, embody. See include.


7. exclude.
Dictionary.com Unabridged

embrace

2 [em-breys]
verb (used with object), embraced, embracing. Law.
to attempt to influence (a judge or jury) through corrupt means.

Origin:
1400–1450; late Middle English: to influence, prejudice, bribe (a jury), perhaps the same word as embrace1, influenced by embrasen to set on fire (< Middle French embraser; see em-1, braise)

embracer, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
embrace1 (ɪmˈbreɪs)
 
vb
1.  (also intr) (of a person) to take or clasp (another person) in the arms, or (of two people) to clasp each other, as in affection, greeting, etc; hug
2.  to accept (an opportunity, challenge, etc) willingly or eagerly
3.  to take up (a new idea, faith, etc); adopt: to embrace Judaism
4.  to comprise or include as an integral part: geology embraces the science of mineralogy
5.  to encircle or enclose
 
n
6.  the act of embracing
7.  euphemistic (often plural) sexual intercourse
 
[C14: from Old French embracier, from em- + brace a pair of arms, from Latin bracchia arms]
 
em'braceable1
 
adj
 
em'bracement1
 
n
 
em'bracer1
 
n

embrace2 (ɪmˈbreɪs)
 
vb
(tr) criminal law to commit or attempt to commit embracery against (a jury, etc)
 
[C15: back formation from embraceor]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

embrace
c.1300, from O.Fr. embracer "clasp in the arms, enclose," from en- "in" + brace "the arms," from L. bracchium (neut. pl. brachia). Replaced O.E. clyppan, also fæðm.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
They quickly embraced low-water gardening practices.
Colleges have long embraced the notion that measuring a student's financial
  need is a science.
Part of the problem is that they have embraced mathematics too fervently,
  according to one view.
Medicine in particular has embraced smartphones as study aids.
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