emigration

[em-i-grey-shuhn]
noun
1.
an act or instance of emigrating.
2.
a body of emigrants; emigrants collectively.
3.
Physiology, diapedesis.

Origin:
1640–50; < Late Latin ēmīgrātiōn- (stem of ēmīgrātiō) removal. See emigrate, -ion

emigrational, adjective
nonemigration, noun
reemigration, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To emigration
Collins
World English Dictionary
emigration (ˌɛmɪˈɡreɪʃən)
 
n
1.  the act or an instance of emigrating
2.  emigrants considered collectively

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

emigration
1649, from L.L. emigrationem (nom. emigratio) "removal from a place," from L. emigrare "move away, depart from a place," from ex- "out" + migrare "to move" (see migration). Emigrant first recorded 1754.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

emigration em·i·gra·tion (ěm'ĭ-grā'shən)
n.
The passage of white blood cells through the walls of small blood vessels.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Cite This Source
Example sentences
Even so, it is questionable that increased prosperity would slow rates of
  emigration.
Perhaps the island is being affected by immigration or emigration.
Population size is determined by four general factors: natality, mortality,
  immigration and emigration.
The benefits from emigration is a cushion to mitigate the pain caused by
  emigration.
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature