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emotion

[ih-moh-shuh n] /ɪˈmoʊ ʃən/
noun
1.
an affective state of consciousness in which joy, sorrow, fear, hate, or the like, is experienced, as distinguished from cognitive and volitional states of consciousness.
2.
any of the feelings of joy, sorrow, fear, hate, love, etc.
3.
any strong agitation of the feelings actuated by experiencing love, hate, fear, etc., and usually accompanied by certain physiological changes, as increased heartbeat or respiration, and often overt manifestation, as crying or shaking.
4.
an instance of this.
5.
something that causes such a reaction:
the powerful emotion of a great symphony.
Origin
1570-1580
1570-80; apparently < Middle French esmotion, derived on the model of movoir: motion, from esmovoir to set in motion, move the feelings < Vulgar Latin *exmovēre, for Latin ēmovēre; see e-1, move, motion
Related forms
emotionable, adjective
emotionless, adjective
preemotion, noun
Synonym Study
1. See feeling.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for emotion
  • She lays much stress on the subconscious mental life, the domain of vague emotion and rapidly fugitive thought.
  • These episodes can range from nightmares to mental reenactments of my injury to inexplicable waves of emotion.
  • We seek candidates with exceptional promise in the social psychology of emotion.
  • Musical training sharpens the ability to sense emotions.
  • Human memory is highly influenced by emotion.
  • The expression of emotion in human speech is a complicated business.
  • The right side of the brain is home to emotion, creativity, and humor.
  • The role of emotions in decisions makes perfect sense.
  • We should set emotion aside and try to take a logical look at the situation.
  • You were caught up with emotion earlier when you wanted to address your teammates.
British Dictionary definitions for emotion

emotion

/ɪˈməʊʃən/
noun
1.
any strong feeling, as of joy, sorrow, or fear
Derived Forms
emotionless, adjective
Word Origin
C16: from French, from Old French esmovoir to excite, from Latin ēmovēre to disturb, from movēre to move
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for emotion
n.

1570s, "a (social) moving, stirring, agitation," from Middle French émotion (16c.), from Old French emouvoir "stir up" (12c.), from Latin emovere "move out, remove, agitate," from ex- "out" (see ex-) + movere "to move" (see move (v.)). Sense of "strong feeling" is first recorded 1650s; extended to any feeling by 1808.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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emotion in Medicine

emotion e·mo·tion (ĭ-mō'shən)
n.
An intense mental state that arises subjectively rather than through conscious effort and is often accompanied by physiological changes.


e·mo'tion·al adj.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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emotion in Science
emotion
  (ĭ-mō'shən)   
A psychological state that arises spontaneously rather than through conscious effort and is sometimes accompanied by physiological changes; a feeling.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Nearby words for emotion