endeavor

[en-dev-er]
verb (used without object)
1.
to exert oneself to do or effect something; make an effort; strive: We must constantly endeavor if we are to succeed.
verb (used with object)
2.
to attempt; try: He endeavors to keep things neat in his apartment.
3.
Archaic. to attempt to achieve or gain.
noun
4.
a strenuous effort; attempt.
Also, especially British, endeavour.


Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English endeveren, from the phrase putten in devoir to make an effort, assume responsibility; compare Anglo-French se mettre en deveir. See en-1, devoir

endeavorer; especially British, endeavourer, noun
preendeavor, noun


1, 2. See try. 4. See effort.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
endeavour or endeavor (ɪnˈdɛvə)
 
vb
1.  to try (to do something)
 
n
2.  an effort to do or attain something
 
[C14: endeveren, from en-1 + -deveren from dever duty, from Old French deveir; see devoirs]
 
endeavor or endeavor
 
vb
 
n
 
[C14: endeveren, from en-1 + -deveren from dever duty, from Old French deveir; see devoirs]
 
en'deavourer or endeavor
 
n
 
en'deavorer or endeavor
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

endeavor
early 15c., lit. "in duty," from phrase put (oneself) in dever "make it one's duty" (a partial translation of O.Fr. mettre en deveir "put in duty"), from O.Fr. dever "duty," from L. debere "to owe" (see debt). One's endeavors meaning one's "utmost effort" is from late 15c.
Related: Endeavored; endeavoring.

endeavour
British spelling of endeavor (q.v.); for suffix, see -or. Related: Endeavoured; endeavoring; endeavours.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
They endeavour to find objections, both to our abstract reasonings, and to those which regard matter of fact and existence.
If he tries to climb out into the air as inexperienced people endeavour to do, he drowns.
Science is the endeavour to increase the body of knowledge.
Notice, if you will, the complete lack of academic endeavour.
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