endeavor

[en-dev-er]
verb (used without object)
1.
to exert oneself to do or effect something; make an effort; strive: We must constantly endeavor if we are to succeed.
verb (used with object)
2.
to attempt; try: He endeavors to keep things neat in his apartment.
3.
Archaic. to attempt to achieve or gain.
noun
4.
a strenuous effort; attempt.
Also, especially British, endeavour.


Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English endeveren, from the phrase putten in devoir to make an effort, assume responsibility; compare Anglo-French se mettre en deveir. See en-1, devoir

endeavorer; especially British, endeavourer, noun
preendeavor, noun


1, 2. See try. 4. See effort.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To endeavoured
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

endeavor
early 15c., lit. "in duty," from phrase put (oneself) in dever "make it one's duty" (a partial translation of O.Fr. mettre en deveir "put in duty"), from O.Fr. dever "duty," from L. debere "to owe" (see debt). One's endeavors meaning one's "utmost effort" is from late 15c.
Related: Endeavored; endeavoring.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Some optimists have endeavoured to find reasons to celebrate it.
She endeavoured to conceal her sickness for fear of being dispensed with or shown any indulgence in the rule.
Whatever instructions he read or heard, he immediately endeavoured fervently to reduce to practice.
Sandys endeavoured to translate as literally as possible.
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