endurable

[en-door-uh-buhl, -dyoor-]
adjective
capable of being endured; bearable; tolerable.

Origin:
1600–10; endure + -able

endurability, endurableness, noun
endurably, adverb
nonendurable, adjective
unendurability, adjective
unendurable, adjective
unendurableness, noun
unendurably, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To endurable
Collins
World English Dictionary
endure (ɪnˈdjʊə)
 
vb
1.  to undergo (hardship, strain, privation, etc) without yielding; bear
2.  (tr) to permit or tolerate
3.  (intr) to last or continue to exist
 
[C14: from Old French endurer, from Latin indūrāre to harden, from dūrus hard]
 
en'durable
 
adj
 
endura'bility
 
n
 
en'durableness
 
n
 
en'durably
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

endurable
c.1600, able to endure, from endure + -able. Meaning able to be endured is from c.1800.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
For theirs is no ordinary insolence,-no common and endurable audacity.
The robots were really funny, except the bad one which was frightening for
  sure, but endurable.
But by making life less endurable for coyotes in your area, you can increase
  the likelihood that they will go somewhere else.
Collected knowledge of all facility experiments and measurements needs to be
  captured as endurable data.
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature