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endure

[en-doo r, -dyoo r] /ɛnˈdʊər, -ˈdyʊər/
verb (used with object), endured, enduring.
1.
to hold out against; sustain without impairment or yielding; undergo:
to endure great financial pressures with equanimity.
2.
to bear without resistance or with patience; tolerate:
I cannot endure your insults any longer.
3.
to admit of; allow; bear:
His poetry is such that it will not endure a superficial reading.
verb (used without object), endured, enduring.
4.
to continue to exist; last:
These words will endure as long as people live who love freedom.
5.
to support adverse force or influence of any kind; suffer without yielding; suffer patiently:
Even in the darkest ages humanity has endured.
6.
to have or gain continued or lasting acknowledgment or recognition, as of worth, merit or greatness:
His plays have endured for more than three centuries.
Origin
1275-1325
1275-1325; Middle English enduren < Anglo-French, Old French endurer < Latin indūrāre to harden, make lasting, equivalent to in- in-2 + dūrāre to last, be or become hard, derivative of dūrus hard
Related forms
endurer, noun
unendured, adjective
Synonyms
2. stand, support, suffer, brook. See bear1 . 4. abide. See continue.
Antonyms
4. fail, die.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for endures
  • Nonetheless, the ritual endures, an intimate reminder of the time before stealth applications.
  • The president's comments come as much of the southeast endures an extended drought.
  • Literature endures because it presents us with a world entire.
  • Throughout history people have prized cocoa-the defining ingredient of chocolate-a tradition that endures in our modern era.
  • Standard battery endures a full day of regular web, video and phone use.
  • And while new snacks are constantly being introduced, popcorn endures.
  • But nonetheless, the historic and artistic atmosphere on this avenue endures.
  • Yet the use of healing herbs endures-particularly simples, used to treat mild ailments.
  • He endures, though, as an emblem of a time when serious culture seemed to weigh a little more than it does today.
  • The economic contribution of brothels is one of the reasons that support for them endures.
British Dictionary definitions for endures

endure

/ɪnˈdjʊə/
verb
1.
to undergo (hardship, strain, privation, etc) without yielding; bear
2.
(transitive) to permit or tolerate
3.
(intransitive) to last or continue to exist
Derived Forms
endurable, adjective
endurability, endurableness, noun
endurably, adverb
Word Origin
C14: from Old French endurer, from Latin indūrāre to harden, from dūrus hard
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for endures

endure

v.

early 14c., "to undergo or suffer" (especially without breaking); late 14c. "to continue in existence," from Old French endurer (12c.) "make hard, harden; bear, tolerate; keep up, maintain," from Latin indurare "make hard," in Late Latin "harden (the heart) against," from in- (see in- (2)) + durare "to harden," from durus "hard," from PIE *deru- "be firm, solid."

Replaced the important Old English verb dreogan (past tense dreag, past participle drogen), which survives in dialectal dree. Related: Endured; endures.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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