endure

[en-door, -dyoor]
verb (used with object), endured, enduring.
1.
to hold out against; sustain without impairment or yielding; undergo: to endure great financial pressures with equanimity.
2.
to bear without resistance or with patience; tolerate: I cannot endure your insults any longer.
3.
to admit of; allow; bear: His poetry is such that it will not endure a superficial reading.
verb (used without object), endured, enduring.
4.
to continue to exist; last: These words will endure as long as people live who love freedom.
5.
to support adverse force or influence of any kind; suffer without yielding; suffer patiently: Even in the darkest ages humanity has endured.
6.
to have or gain continued or lasting acknowledgment or recognition, as of worth, merit or greatness: His plays have endured for more than three centuries.

Origin:
1275–1325; Middle English enduren < Anglo-French, Old French endurer < Latin indūrāre to harden, make lasting, equivalent to in- in-2 + dūrāre to last, be or become hard, derivative of dūrus hard

endurer, noun
unendured, adjective


2. stand, support, suffer, brook. See bear1. 4. abide. See continue.


4. fail, die.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
endure (ɪnˈdjʊə)
 
vb
1.  to undergo (hardship, strain, privation, etc) without yielding; bear
2.  (tr) to permit or tolerate
3.  (intr) to last or continue to exist
 
[C14: from Old French endurer, from Latin indūrāre to harden, from dūrus hard]
 
en'durable
 
adj
 
endura'bility
 
n
 
en'durableness
 
n
 
en'durably
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

endure
late 14c., from O.Fr. endurer, from L. indurare "make hard," in L.L. "harden (the heart) against," from in- "in" + durare "to harden," from durus "hard," from PIE *deru- "be firm, solid." Replaced the important O.E. verb dreogan (pt. dreag, pp. drogen), which survives in dial. dree. Related: Endured;
endures.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Nonetheless, the ritual endures, an intimate reminder of the time before
  stealth applications.
The president's comments come as much of the southeast endures an extended
  drought.
Literature endures because it presents us with a world entire.
Throughout history people have prized cocoa-the defining ingredient of
  chocolate-a tradition that endures in our modern era.
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