entrance

1 [en-truhns]
noun
1.
an act of entering, as into a place or upon new duties.
2.
a point or place of entering; an opening or passage for entering, as a doorway.
3.
the right, privilege, or permission to enter; admission: People improperly dressed will be refused entrance to the theater.
4.
Theater. the moment or place in the script at which an actor comes on the stage.
5.
Music.
a.
the point in a musical score at which a particular voice or instrument joins the ensemble.
b.
the way in which this is done: a sloppy entrance.
6.
a manner, means, or style of entering a room, group, etc.; way of coming into view: She mimicked Joan's entrance.
7.
Nautical. the immersed portion of a hull forward of the middle body (opposed to run ).

Origin:
1425–75; late Middle English entraunce < Middle French entrance. See enter, -ance


1, 2. entry, ingress. 3. Entrance, admittance, admission refer to the possibility of entering a place or a group. Entrance may refer to either possibility: Entrance is by way of the side door; entrance into a card game. Admittance refers more to place and suggests entrance that may be permitted or denied: to gain admittance to a building; no admittance. Admission refers more to special groups and suggests entrance by payment, by formal or special permission, privilege, and the like: admission to a concert, a game, to candidacy, the bar, to society.


1, 2. exit.
Dictionary.com Unabridged

entrance

2 [en-trans, -trahns]
verb (used with object), entranced, entrancing.
1.
to fill with delight or wonder; enrapture.
2.
to put into a trance: to be hypnotically entranced.

Origin:
1585–95; en-1 + trance1

entrancement, noun
unentranced, adjective


1. enthrall, spellbind, fascinate, transport.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
entrance1 (ˈɛntrəns)
 
n
1.  the act or an instance of entering; entry
2.  a place for entering, such as a door or gate
3.  a.  the power, liberty, or right of entering; admission
 b.  (as modifier): an entrance fee
4.  the coming of an actor or other performer onto a stage
 
[C16: from French, from entrer to enter]

entrance2 (ɪnˈtrɑːns)
 
vb
1.  to fill with wonder and delight; enchant
2.  to put into a trance; hypnotize
 
en'trancement2
 
n
 
en'trancing2
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

entrance
1520s, from M.Fr. entrance, from entrer (see enter). Originally "act of entering," sense of "door, gate" first recorded in English 1530s.

entrance
"to throw into a trance," 1593, from en- "put in" + trance (q.v.).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences for entrances
The group indulges their every material desire as the undead paw at the mall entrances.
The crab pot usually contains two entrances for the crabs that prohibit exit.
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