Entrapping

entrap

[en-trap]
verb (used with object), entrapped, entrapping.
1.
to catch in or as in a trap; ensnare: The hunters used nets to entrap the lion.
2.
to bring unawares into difficulty or danger: He entrapped himself in the web of his own lies.
3.
to lure into performing an act or making a statement that is compromising or illegal.
4.
to draw into contradiction or damaging admission: The questioner entrapped her into an admission of guilt.
5.
Law. to catch by entrapment.

Origin:
1525–35; < Middle French entraper. See en-1, trap1

entrapper, noun
entrappingly, adverb
unentrapped, adjective


1. capture, snare, trap.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
entrap (ɪnˈtræp)
 
vb , -traps, -trapping, -trapped
1.  to catch or snare in or as if in a trap
2.  to lure or trick into danger, difficulty, or embarrassment
 
en'trapper
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

entrap
1530s, from O.Fr. entraper; see en- + trap.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Matching Quote
"I can just remember an old brown-coated man who was the Walton of this stream, who had come over from Newcastle, England, with his son,—the latter a stout and hearty man who had lifted an anchor in his day. A straight old man he was, who took his way in silence through the meadows, having passed the period of communication with his fellows; his old experienced coat, hanging long and straight and brown as the yellow pine bark, glittering with so much smothered sunlight, if you stood near enough, no work of art but naturalized at length. I often discovered him unexpectedly amid the pads and the gray willows when he moved, fishing in some old country method,—for youth and age then went a-fishing together,—full of incommunicable thoughts, perchance about his own Tyne and Northumberland. He was always to be seen in serene afternoons haunting the river, and almost rustling with the sedge; so many sunny hours in an old man's life, entrapping silly fish; almost grown to be the sun's familiar; what need had he of hat or raiment any, having served out his time, and seen through such thin disguises? I have seen how his coeval fates rewarded him with the yellow perch, and yet I thought his luck was not in proportion to his years; and I have seen when, with slow steps and weighed down with aged thoughts, he disappeared with his fish under his low-roofed house on the skirts of the village. I think nobody else saw him; nobody else remembers him now, for he soon after died, and migrated to new Tyne streams. His fishing was not a sport, nor solely a means of subsistence, but a sort of solemn sacrament and withdrawal from the world, just as the aged read their Bibles."
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