epanaphora

epanaphora

[ep-uh-naf-er-uh]
noun Rhetoric.
anaphora ( def 1 ).

Origin:
1670–80; < Greek epanaphorá referring, reference. See ep-, anaphora

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epanaphora (ˌɛpəˈnæfərə)
 
n
rhetoric another word for anaphora
 
epan'aphoral
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Encyclopedia Britannica
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epanaphora

(Greek: "a carrying up or back"), a literary or oratorical device involving the repetition of a word or phrase at the beginning of several sentences or clauses, as in the well-known passage from the Old Testament (Ecclesiastes 3:1-2) that begins:For everything there is a season, and a timefor every matter under heaven:a time to be born, and a time to die;a time to plant, and a time to pluck upwhat is planted; . . .

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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