errand

[er-uhnd]
noun
1.
a short and quick trip to accomplish a specific purpose, as to buy something, deliver a package, or convey a message, often for someone else.
2.
the purpose of such a trip: He finished his errands.
3.
a special mission or function entrusted to a messenger; commission.

Origin:
before 900; Middle English erande, Old English ærende; cognate with Old High German āruntī; compare Old English ār messenger, Gothic airus


1, 2. mission, task, assignment, chore.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
errand (ˈɛrənd)
 
n
1.  a short trip undertaken to perform a necessary task or commission (esp in the phrase run errands)
2.  the purpose or object of such a trip
 
[Old English ǣrende; related to ār messenger, Old Norse erendi message, Old High German ārunti, Swedish ärende]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

errand
O.E. ærende "message, mission," from P.Gmc. *ærundjam. Related: Errands.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
They also run errands for elderly and handicapped people.
Tales of students who run errands for professors for little or no pay are
  graduate-school lore.
We might then see more people using them for short errands that require
  carrying more stuff than is comfortable walking.
Walking or bicycling for your daily errands reduces vehicle emissions.
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