erudition

[er-yoo-dish-uhn, er-oo-]
noun
knowledge acquired by study, research, etc.; learning; scholarship.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English < Latin ērudītiōn- (stem of ērudītiō) an instruction. See erudite, -ion

eruditional, adjective
nonerudition, noun


See learning.
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World English Dictionary
erudite (ˈɛrʊˌdaɪt)
 
adj
having or showing extensive scholarship; learned
 
[C15: from Latin ērudītus, from ērudīre to polish, from ex-1 + rudis unpolished, rough]
 
'eruditely
 
adv
 
erudition
 
n
 
'eruditeness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

erudition
c.1400, from L. eruditionem, noun of action from erudire (see erudite).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Impressed with his erudition on a wide range of topics, people would often ask
  him where he got his education.
If erudition and populism mixed giddily that day, so did thoroughness and
  irrelevance.
Despite these shortcomings, Bryson's erudition is evident and refreshing.
Historiographical concerns born of immense erudition structure the book.
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