ethel waters

Waters

[waw-terz, wot-erz]
noun
1.
Ethel, 1896–1977, U.S. singer and actress.
2.
Muddy [muhd-ee] , (McKinley Morganfield) 1915–83, U.S. blues singer and musician.
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World English Dictionary
waters
 
pl n
1.  any body of sea, or seas regarded as sharing some common quality: Irish territorial waters; uncharted tropical waters
2.  (sometimes singular) physiol the amniotic fluid surrounding the fetus in the womb

Waters (ˈwɔːtəz)
 
n
Muddy, real name McKinley Morganfield. 1915--83, US blues guitarist, singer, and songwriter. His songs include "Rollin' Stone" (1948) and "Got my Mojo Working" (1954)

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

water
O.E. wæter, from P.Gmc. *watar (cf. O.S. watar, O.Fris. wetir, Du. water, O.H.G. wazzar, Ger. Wasser, O.N. vatn, Goth. wato "water"), from PIE *wodor/*wedor/*uder-, from root *wed- (cf. Hittite watar, Skt. udnah, Gk. hydor, O.C.S., Rus. voda, Lith. vanduo, O.Prus. wundan, Gael. uisge "water;"
L. unda "wave"). Linguists believe PIE had two root words for water: *ap- and *wed-. The first (preserved in Skt. apah) was "animate," referring to water as a living force; the latter referred to it as an inanimate substance. The same was probably true of fire (n.). To keep (one's) head above water in the fig. sense is recorded from 1742. Water cooler is recorded from 1846; water polo from 1884; water torture from 1928. First record of water-closet is from 1755. Water-ice as a confection is from 1818. Watering-place is 1440, of animals, 1757, of persons. Water-lily first attested 1549. Waterfront is attested from 1856.

water
O.E. wæterian (see water (n.1)). Meaning "to dilute" is attested from late 14c.; now usually as water down (1850). To make water "urinate" is recorded from early 15c.

water
measure of quality of a diamond, 1607, from water (n.1), perhaps as a transl. of Arabic ma' "water," which also is used in the sense "lustre, splendor."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

water wa·ter (wô'tər)
n.

  1. A clear, colorless, odorless, and tasteless liquid essential for most plant and animal life and the most widely used of all solvents. Freezing point 0°C (32°F); boiling point 100°C (212°F); specific gravity (4°C) 1.0000; weight per gallon (15°C) 8.338 pounds (3.782 kilograms).

  2. Any of the liquids that are present in or passed out of the body, such as urine, perspiration, tears, or saliva.

  3. The fluid that surrounds a fetus in the uterus; amniotic fluid.

  4. An aqueous solution of a substance, especially a gas.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
water   (wô'tər)  Pronunciation Key 
A colorless, odorless compound of hydrogen and oxygen. Water covers about three-quarters of the Earth's surface in solid form (ice) and liquid form, and is prevalent in the lower atmosphere in its gaseous form, water vapor. Water is an unusually good solvent for a large variety of substances, and is an essential component of all organisms, being necessary for most biological processes. Unlike most substances, water is less dense as ice than in liquid form; thus, ice floats on liquid water. Water freezes at 0°C (32°F) and boils at 100°C (212°F). Chemical formula: H2O.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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