ethnography

[eth-nog-ruh-fee]
noun
a branch of anthropology dealing with the scientific description of individual cultures.

Origin:
1825–35; ethno- + -graphy

ethnographer, noun
ethnographic [eth-nuh-graf-ik] , ethnographical, adjective
ethnographically, adverb
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
ethnography (ɛθˈnɒɡrəfɪ)
 
n
the branch of anthropology that deals with the scientific description of individual human societies
 
eth'nographer
 
n
 
ethnographic
 
adj
 
ethno'graphical
 
adj
 
ethno'graphically
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

ethnography
from ethno- + -graphy "the study of." Related: Ethnographer; ethnographic.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
ethnography   (ěth-nŏg'rə-fē)  Pronunciation Key 
The branch of anthropology that deals with the scientific description of specific human cultures.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Example sentences
Each principal ethnographer had a close tie with the community and previously worked in and resided near the study area.
Each of these methods and still others are a part of the ethnographer's tool kit.
Argues that teachers can benefit by taking an ethnographer's stance in engaging students.
He posed as an ethnographer out to capture the last images of a vanishing race.
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