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etiolate

[ee-tee-uh-leyt] /ˈi ti əˌleɪt/
verb (used with object), etiolated, etiolating.
1.
to cause (a plant) to whiten or grow pale by excluding light:
to etiolate celery.
2.
to cause to become weakened or sickly; drain of color or vigor.
verb (used without object), etiolated, etiolating.
3.
(of plants) to whiten or grow pale through lack of light.
Origin of etiolate
1785-1795
1785-95; < French étioler to make pale, etiolate (plants), probably derivative, based on N French dial. forms, of standard French éteule, Old French estoble, estuble stubble; see -ate1
Related forms
etiolation, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for etiolated
Historical Examples
  • The undergrowth was green, but in the etiolated way of plants which have little light, though that may have been my fancy.

    The Sea and the Jungle H. M. Tomlinson
  • His voice was hollow, etiolated like a flower grown in darkness.

    The Jewels of Aptor Samuel R. Delany
  • And he had a kind of sickness very repulsive to a sensitive girl, something cunning and etiolated and degenerate.

    The Rainbow D. H. (David Herbert) Lawrence
  • etiolated, blanched by excluding the light, as the stalks of Celery.

  • Then the pale, etiolated voices of the nuns, the wailing of these weak voices—there were three altos, three sopranos—began again.

    Evelyn Innes George Moore
  • His abstract and etiolated internationalism has been replaced by the warm humanity of writers like, say, David or Pernerstorfer.

  • Pauline surrendered, and they went across the etiolated lawn toward the entrance.

    Guy and Pauline Compton Mackenzie
  • I had noticed that the woman was raw-boned and stoop-shouldered, with that etiolated yellow flesh that comes of long overwork.

  • Suddenly began the plaint of the organ, and some half-dozen voices sang a hymn; and these pale, etiolated voices interested her.

    Evelyn Innes George Moore
  • Chicken-hazard is scotched, not killed; but a poor, weazened, etiolated biped is that once game-bird now.

British Dictionary definitions for etiolated

etiolate

/ˈiːtɪəʊˌleɪt/
verb
1.
(botany) to whiten (a green plant) through lack of sunlight
2.
to become or cause to become pale and weak, as from malnutrition
Derived Forms
etiolation, noun
Word Origin
C18: from French étioler to make pale, probably from Old French estuble straw, from Latin stipula
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for etiolated

etiolate

v.

of plants, "grown in darkness," 1791, from French étiolé, past participle of étioler "to blanch" (17c.), perhaps literally "to become like straw," from Norman dialect étule "a stalk," Old French esteule "straw, field of stubble," from Latin stipula "straw." Related: Etiolated.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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