Euclidian

Euclidean

[yoo-klid-ee-uhn]
adjective
of or pertaining to Euclid, or adopting his postulates.
Also, Euclidian.


Origin:
1650–60; < Latin Euclīdē(us) of Euclid (< Greek Eukleídeios) + -an

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World English Dictionary
Euclid (ˈjuːklɪd)
 
n
1.  3rd century bc, Greek mathematician of Alexandria; author of Elements, which sets out the principles of geometry and remained a text until the 19th century at least
2.  the works of Euclid, esp his system of geometry
 
Euclidean
 
adj
 
Euclidian
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

Euclidean
1660, "of or pertaining to Euclid," from Gk. Eukleides, c.300 B.C.E. geometer of Alexandria. Now often used in contrast to alternative models based on rejection of some of his axioms. His name in Gk. means "renowned," from eu- "well" + kleos "fame."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
Euclidean   (y-klĭd'ē-ən)  Pronunciation Key 
Relating to geometry of plane figures based on the five postulates (axioms) of Euclid, involving the derivation of theorems from those postulates. The five postulates are: 1. Any two points can be joined by a straight line. 2. Any straight line segment can be extended indefinitely in a straight line. 3. Given any straight line segment, a circle can be drawn having the line segment as radius and an endpoint as center. 4. All right angles are congruent. 5. (Also called the parallel postulate.) If two lines are drawn that intersect a third in such a way that the sum of inner angles on one side is less than the sum of two right triangles, then the two lines will intersect each other on that side if the lines are extended far enough. Compare non-Euclidean.
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