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evict

[ih-vikt] /ɪˈvɪkt/
verb (used with object)
1.
to expel (a person, especially a tenant) from land, a building, etc., by legal process, as for nonpayment of rent.
2.
to recover (property, titles, etc.) by virtue of superior legal title.
Origin
late Middle English
1400-1450
1400-50; late Middle English evicten < Late Latin ēvictus having recovered one's property by law, Latin: past participle of ēvincere to overcome, conquer, evince), equivalent to ē- e-1 + vic- (past participle stem of vincere; see victor) + -tus past participle suffix
Related forms
eviction, noun
evictor, noun
noneviction, noun
reevict, verb (used with object)
unevicted, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for eviction
  • The farmers have been beaten, and several of them killed while resisting eviction from their homes.
  • When he does rebel, he is given the alternative of submission, or eviction with entire loss of employment.
  • They could not pay the rent and feared eviction, or they did not have cash to buy shoes for their children when school opened.
  • They were on the verge of eviction for nonpayment of rent.
  • Bad move, since the eviction triggers an evil curse.
  • State legislators are paying their own office rent to avoid eviction.
  • Thousands of policemen arrived to carry out a court-ordered eviction, though they found only nine tenants.
  • Hundreds of families face eviction from mine-owned houses.
  • Our buddies in the eviction and demolition department taught us that one.
  • The fictional tale of land expropriation and eviction seemed to cut too close to the bone.
British Dictionary definitions for eviction

evict

/ɪˈvɪkt/
verb (transitive)
1.
to expel (a tenant) from property by process of law; turn out
2.
to recover (property or the title to property) by judicial process or by virtue of a superior title
Derived Forms
eviction, noun
evictor, noun
evictee, noun
Word Origin
C15: from Late Latin ēvincere, from Latin: to vanquish utterly, from vincere to conquer
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for eviction
n.

mid-15c., from Middle French éviction, from Latin evictionem (nominative evictio) "recovery of one's property," noun of action from past participle stem of evincere (see evict).

evict

v.

mid-15c., "recover (property) by judicial means," from Latin evictus, past participle of evincere "recover property, overcome and expel, conquer," from ex- "out" (see ex-) + vincere "conquer" (see victor). Sense of "expel by legal process" first recorded in English 1530s. Related: Evicted; evicting.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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