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evidence

[ev-i-duh ns] /ˈɛv ɪ dəns/
noun
1.
that which tends to prove or disprove something; ground for belief; proof.
2.
something that makes plain or clear; an indication or sign:
His flushed look was visible evidence of his fever.
3.
Law. data presented to a court or jury in proof of the facts in issue and which may include the testimony of witnesses, records, documents, or objects.
verb (used with object), evidenced, evidencing.
4.
to make evident or clear; show clearly; manifest:
He evidenced his approval by promising his full support.
5.
to support by evidence:
He evidenced his accusation with incriminating letters.
Idioms
6.
in evidence, plainly visible; conspicuous:
The first signs of spring are in evidence.
Origin
1250-1300
1250-1300; Middle English (noun) < Middle French < Latin ēvidentia. See evident, -ence
Related forms
counterevidence, noun
preevidence, noun
reevidence, verb (used with object), reevidenced, reevidencing.
superevidence, noun
unevidenced, adjective
well-evidenced, adjective
Synonyms
3. information, deposition, affidavit. Evidence, exhibit, testimony, proof refer to information furnished in a legal investigation to support a contention. Evidence is any information so given, whether furnished by witnesses or derived from documents or from any other source: Hearsay evidence is not admitted in a trial. An exhibit in law is a document or article that is presented in court as evidence: The signed contract is Exhibit A. Testimony is usually evidence given by witnesses under oath: The jury listened carefully to the testimony. Proof is evidence that is so complete and convincing as to put a conclusion beyond reasonable doubt: proof of the innocence of the accused. 4. demonstrate.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for evidenced
  • The proudly, humorous tone of this piece is perfect for your audience, as evidenced by the comments.
  • Food crimes don't seem to be letting up, as evidenced by the following four incidents.
  • Contrary to popular opinion, the pace of technological innovation has been quite slow, as evidenced by the data.
  • Old age sees progression give way to regression, as is evidenced by the physical deterioration of voice and body.
  • It is not surprising that this may be evidenced by increased radiation in a number of bands.
  • The only arrogance is evidenced by the inane and obtuse postings above.
  • Sometimes they can immediately determine the likely source of trouble, such as water damage evidenced by visible stains.
  • Despite our dedication, the criticisms continue, as evidenced in yet another book about college admissions.
  • Our papers are extremely complicated and highly original that always gains worldwide attention as evidenced by citation.
  • Much of this impacted housing as evidenced by the run up in prices, but also other areas, such as revolving credit.
British Dictionary definitions for evidenced

evidence

/ˈɛvɪdəns/
noun
1.
ground for belief or disbelief; data on which to base proof or to establish truth or falsehood
2.
a mark or sign that makes evident; indication his pallor was evidence of ill health
3.
(law) matter produced before a court of law in an attempt to prove or disprove a point in issue, such as the statements of witnesses, documents, material objects, etc See also circumstantial evidence, direct evidence
4.
turn queen's evidence, turn king's evidence, turn state's evidence, (of an accomplice) to act as witness for the prosecution and testify against those associated with him in crime
5.
in evidence, on display; apparent; conspicuous her new ring was in evidence
verb (transitive)
6.
to make evident; show clearly
7.
to give proof of or evidence for
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for evidenced
evidence
c.1300, "appearance from which inferences may be drawn," from Fr. évidence, from L.L. evidentia "proof," originally "distinction," from L. evidentem (see evident). Meaning "ground for belief" is from late 14c., that of "obviousness" is 1660s. Legal senses are from c.1500, when it began to oust witness. As a verb, from c.1600. Related: Evidenced; evidencing
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Idioms and Phrases with evidenced
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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