ex purgation

expurgate

[ek-sper-geyt]
verb (used with object), expurgated, expurgating.
1.
to amend by removing words, passages, etc., deemed offensive or objectionable: Most children read an expurgated version of Grimms' fairy tales.
2.
to purge or cleanse of moral offensiveness.

Origin:
1615–25; < Latin expurgātus, past participle of expurgāre to clean out. See ex-1, purge, -ate1

expurgation, noun
expurgator, noun
unexpurgated, adjective


1. delete, excise, censor, purge, bowdlerize.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To ex purgation
Collins
World English Dictionary
expurgate (ˈɛkspəˌɡeɪt)
 
vb
(tr) to amend (a book, text, etc) by removing (obscene or offensive sections)
 
[C17: from Latin expurgāre to clean out, from purgāre to purify; see purge]
 
expur'gation
 
n
 
'expurgator
 
n
 
expurgatory
 
adj
 
expurgatorial
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

expurgate
1620s, from L. expurgatus, pp. of expurgare "to cleanse out" (see expurgation). Related: Expurgated; expurgating. The earlier verb was simply expurge (late 15c.), from M.Fr. expurger.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary
expurgate [(ek-spuhr-gayt)]

To clean up, remove impurities. An expurgated edition of a book has had offensive words or descriptions changed or removed.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Cite This Source
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature