ex tempore

extempore

[ik-stem-puh-ree]
adverb
1.
on the spur of the moment; without premeditation or preparation; offhand: Questions were asked extempore from the floor.
2.
without notes: to speak extempore.
3.
(of musical performance) by improvisation.
adjective
4.
extemporaneous; impromptu.

Origin:
1545–55; < Latin: literally, out of the time, at the moment, equivalent to ex out of (see ex-1) + tempore the time (ablative singular of tempus)

nonextempore, adverb, adjective


4. See extemporaneous.
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World English Dictionary
extempore (ɪkˈstɛmpərɪ)
 
adv, —adj
without planning or preparation; impromptu
 
[C16: from Latin ex tempore instantaneously, from ex-1 out of + tempus time]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

extempore
1550s (adv.), 1630s (n.), from L. phrase ex tempore "offhand, in accordance with (the needs of) the moment," lit. "out of time," from ex- "out of" + tempore, abl. of tempus (gen. temporis) "time." Of speaking, strictly "without preparation, without time to prepare," but now often with a sense merely
of "without notes or a teleprompter." Related: Extemporize (1717) "to speak ex tempore;" extemporizing.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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