exfoliative dermatitis

Medical Dictionary

exfoliative dermatitis n.
Widespread dermatitis characterized by scaling and shedding of the skin and usually accompanied by redness. Also called pityriasis rubra, Wilson's disease.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Encyclopedia Britannica
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exfoliative dermatitis

generalized redness and scaling of the skin that usually arises as a complication of a preexisting skin disease or of an allergy. More rarely, it may be indicative of a systemic disease, such as cancer of the lymphoid tissue. The onset of exfoliative dermatitis is gradual; initial single lesions coalesce into large patches of scaly, red skin that may extend over any part of the body until no healthy skin is left. Hair and nails may lose their lustre and become brittle and fall. Occasionally, a yellow secretion may ooze out of the skin. Itching is variable and may be intense. The continuous shedding of the scales results in a significant loss of body protein. The maintenance of body temperature is also affected, because of the plugging of a majority of sweat ducts; the patient feels cold and feverish. Treatment focusses on the underlying primary disease. Rest and a high protein diet are beneficial. Exfoliative dermatitis is most common in middle life, affecting more men than women, by a ratio of about three to one.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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