exigent

[ek-si-juhnt]
adjective
1.
requiring immediate action or aid; urgent; pressing.
2.
requiring a great deal, or more than is reasonable.
Also, exigeant.


Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English < Latin exigent- (stem of exigēns) (present participle of exigere to drive out, demand), equivalent to ex- ex-1 + -ig- (combining form of agere to drive) + -ent- -ent

exigently, adverb
nonexigent, adjective
nonexigently, adverb
unexigent, adjective
unexigently, adverb
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World English Dictionary
exigent (ˈɛksɪdʒənt)
 
adj
1.  urgent; pressing
2.  exacting; demanding
 
[C15: from Latin exigere to drive out, weigh out, from agere to drive, compel]
 
'exigently
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

exigent
1660s, "urgent," from L. exigentem, prp. of exigere "to demand" (see exact).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
This is one of the most exigent problems facing the profession today.
How much and what type of urgency constitutes an exigent circumstance? .
The exigent time scale of the evolutionary crisis still has not captured their
  attention.
We are all so greedy, so demanding, and so exigent nowadays.
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