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expedite

[ek-spi-dahyt] /ˈɛk spɪˌdaɪt/
verb (used with object), expedited, expediting.
1.
to speed up the progress of; hasten:
to expedite shipments.
2.
to accomplish promptly, as a piece of business; dispatch:
to expedite one's duties.
3.
to issue or dispatch, as an official document or letter.
adjective
4.
Obsolete. ready for action; alert.
Origin
late Middle English
1425-1475
1425-75; late Middle English < Latin expedītus (past participle of expedīre to disengage, set the feet free), equivalent to ex- ex-1 + ped- (stem of pēs) foot + -ītus -ite2
Related forms
unexpedited, adjective
Synonyms
1. quicken, push, accelerate, hurry.
Antonyms
1. delay.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for expediting
  • Various improvements were made afterwards, greatly expediting the work.
  • Or maybe they went all out, expediting the process and blowing out any flames.
  • The group used human genetic material in the monkeys in the interest of expediting future research.
  • There is no good morality in putting one's comfort ahead of the real lives that could be saved by expediting research.
  • Err on the side of expediting versus not expediting.
  • Three years experience in purchasing and expediting materials, supplies and equipment.
  • expediting and maintaining an orderly flow of air traffic.
British Dictionary definitions for expediting

expedite

/ˈɛkspɪˌdaɪt/
verb (transitive)
1.
to hasten the progress of; hasten or assist
2.
to do or process (something, such as business matters) with speed and efficiency
3.
(rare) to dispatch (documents, messages, etc)
adjective (obsolete)
4.
unimpeded or prompt; expeditious
5.
alert or prepared
Word Origin
C17: from Latin expedīre, literally: to free the feet (as from a snare), hence, liberate, from ex-1 + pēs foot
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for expediting

expedite

v.

late 15c. (implied in past participle expedit), from Latin expeditus, past participle of expedire "extricate, disengage, liberate; procure, make ready, make fit, prepare," literally "free the feet from fetters," hence "liberate from difficulties," from ex- "out" (see ex-) + *pedis "fetter, chain for the feet," related to pes (genitive pedis) "foot" (see foot). Cf. Greek pede "fetter." Related: Expedited; expediting.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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