expel

[ik-spel]
verb (used with object), expelled, expelling.
1.
to drive or force out or away; discharge or eject: to expel air from the lungs; to expel an invader from a country.
2.
to cut off from membership or relations: to expel a student from a college.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English expellen < Latin expellere to drive out, drive away, equivalent to ex- ex-1 + pellere to push, drive

expellable, adjective
reexpel, verb (used with object), reexpelled, reexpelling.
unexpellable, adjective
unexpelled, adjective


2. oust, dismiss, exile, excommunicate.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
expel (ɪkˈspɛl)
 
vb , -pels, -pelling, -pelled
1.  to eject or drive out with force
2.  to deprive of participation in or membership of a school, club, etc
 
[C14: from Latin expellere to drive out, from pellere to thrust, drive]
 
ex'pellable
 
adj
 
expellee
 
n
 
ex'peller
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

expel
late 14c., from L. expellere "drive out," from ex- "out" + pellere "to drive." Meaning "to eject from a school" is first recorded 1640s. Related: Expelled; expelling.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Fast swimmers, they can jet forward by expelling water through their mantles.
Corals under temperature stress blanch, expelling symbiotic algae that hide the
  white skeletons below them.
Expelling these common misconceptions is key to improving overall scientific
  literacy.
Still, expelling junk food won't do much to improve school cafeterias.
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