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exploit2

[ik-sploit] /ɪkˈsplɔɪt/
verb (used with object)
1.
to utilize, especially for profit; turn to practical account:
to exploit a business opportunity.
2.
to use selfishly for one's own ends:
employers who exploit their workers.
3.
to advance or further through exploitation; promote:
He exploited his new movie through a series of guest appearances.
Origin
late Middle English
1375-1425
1375-1425; < French exploiter, derivative of exploit (noun); replacing late Middle English expleiten to achieve < Anglo-French espleiter, derivative of espleit (noun). See exploit1
Related forms
exploitable, adjective
exploitability, noun
exploitative, exploitatory
[ik-sploi-tuh-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee] /ɪkˈsplɔɪ təˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i/ (Show IPA),
exploitive, adjective
exploiter, noun
half-exploited, adjective
nonexploitable, adjective
nonexploitative, adjective
nonexploitive, adjective
self-exploited, adjective
self-exploiting, adjective
unexploitable, adjective
unexploitative, adjective
unexploited, adjective
unexploitive, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for exploitive
  • Boycott bullfights and other festivals that use animals in potentially exploitive ways.
  • And this is a good illustration of the greedy, exploitive nature of casinos and gambling.
  • They are often the first government authorities to witness exploitive labor practices in the workplace.
  • Facility's duty to inform residents of their right to report abusive, neglectful, or exploitive practices.
  • Be able to interact in a non-exploitive, socially appropriate way and have ability to establish emotionally healthy relationships.
British Dictionary definitions for exploitive

exploit

noun (ˈɛksplɔɪt)
1.
a notable deed or feat, esp one that is noble or heroic
verb (transitive) (ɪkˈsplɔɪt)
2.
to take advantage of (a person, situation, etc), esp unethically or unjustly for one's own ends
3.
to make the best use of to exploit natural resources
Derived Forms
exploitable, adjective
exploitation, noun
exploitive, exploitative, adjective
Word Origin
C14: from Old French: accomplishment, from Latin explicitum (something) unfolded, from explicāre to explicate
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for exploitive
exploit
late 14c., from O.Fr. esploit, a very common verb, used in senses of "action, deed, profit, achievement," from L. explicitum "a thing settled, ended, displayed," neut. of explicitus, pp. of explicare "unfold" (see explicit). Sense evolution is from "unfolding" to "bringing out" to "having advantage" to "achievement." Related: Exploits.
exploit
M.E. espleiten, esploiten "to accomplish;" the sense of "use selfishly" first recorded 1838, as an adoption of Fr. exploiter. See exploit (n.). Related: Exploited; exploiting. As an adjective form, exploitative (1882) is from French; exploitive (by 1859) appears to be a native formation
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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