eye tooth

eyetooth

[ahy-tooth]
noun, plural eyeteeth [ahy-teeth] .
1.
Dentistry. a canine tooth of the upper jaw: so named from its position under the eye.
Idioms
2.
cut one's eyeteeth,
a.
to gain sophistication or experience; become worldly-wise.
b.
Also, cut one's eyeteeth on. to be initiated or gain one's first experience in (a career, hobby, skill, etc.).
3.
give one's eyeteeth, to give something one considers very precious, usually in exchange for an object or situation one desires: She would give her eyeteeth for that job.

Origin:
1570–80; eye + tooth

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
eyetooth (ˌaɪˈtuːθ)
 
n , pl -teeth
1.  either of the two canine teeth in the upper jaw
2.  give one's eyeteeth for to go to any lengths to achieve or obtain (something): I'd give my eyeteeth for a radio as good as that

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

eyetooth
1580, so called for its position immediately under or next to the eye.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

eyetooth eye·tooth (ī'tōōth')
n.
A canine tooth of the upper jaw.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

eye tooth

in mammals, any of the single-cusped (pointed), usually single-rooted teeth adapted for tearing food, and occurring behind or beside the incisors (front teeth). Often the largest teeth in the mouth, the canines project beyond the level of the other teeth and may interlock when the mouth is closed, restricting the animal to an up-and-down chewing action. Among sheep, oxen, and deer, only the upper canines are large; the lower ones resemble incisors. Rodents lack canines. The tusks of wild boar, walrus, and the extinct sabre-toothed cat are enlarged canines. In some animals (e.g., pig, deer, baboon, gorilla), the male has much larger canines than does the female; these perform a threatening and protective function besides that of tearing. (The tusks of elephants are upper incisors, not canine teeth. Canine teeth are absent.)

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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