follow Dictionary.com

Stories We Like: Novels For Language Lovers

eyelet

[ahy-lit] /ˈaɪ lɪt/
noun
1.
a small hole, usually round and finished along the edge, as in cloth or leather for the passage of a lace or cord or as in embroidery for ornamental effect.
2.
a lightweight fabric pierced by small holes finished with stitching and often laid out in flowerlike designs.
3.
a metal ring for lining a small hole; grommet.
4.
an eyehole in a wall, mask, etc.
5.
Also, oillet, oyelet, oylet. (in medieval architecture) a small aperture in a wall used as a window or loophole.
6.
a small eye.
verb (used with object), eyeleted or eyeletted, eyeleting or eyeletting.
7.
to make an eyelet in.
8.
to insert metal eyelets in.
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English oillet < Old French oillet, equivalent to oill eye (< Latin oculus; see ocular) + -et -et; influenced by eye
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
British Dictionary definitions for eye-letted

eyelet

/ˈaɪlɪt/
noun
1.
a small hole for a lace or cord to be passed through or for a hook to be inserted into
2.
a small metal ring or tube with flared ends bent back, reinforcing an eyehole in fabric
3.
a chink or small opening, such as a peephole in a wall
4.
(embroidery)
  1. a small hole with finely stitched edges, forming part of an ornamental pattern
  2. Also called eyelet embroidery. a piece of embroidery decorated with such work
5.
fabric decorated with such work produced by machine
6.
a small eye or eyelike marking
verb
7.
(transitive) to supply with an eyelet or eyelets
Word Origin
C14: from Old French oillet, literally: a little eye, from oill eye, from Latin oculus eye; see eye1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for eye-letted

eyelet

n.

"small hole," late 14c., oilet, from Middle French oeillet, diminutive of oeil "eye," from Latin oculus (see eye (n.)). Spelling influenced by eye.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Word Value for eye

6
5
Scrabble Words With Friends

Quotes with eye-letted