falsify

[fawl-suh-fahy]
verb (used with object), falsified, falsifying.
1.
to make false or incorrect, especially so as to deceive: to falsify income-tax reports.
2.
to alter fraudulently.
3.
to represent falsely: He falsified the history of his family to conceal his humble origins.
4.
to show or prove to be false; disprove: to falsify a theory.
verb (used without object), falsified, falsifying.
5.
to make false statements.

Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English falsifien < Middle French falsifier < Late Latin falsificāre. See false, -ify

falsifiable, adjective
falsifiability, noun
falsification [fawl-suh-fi-key-shuhn] , noun
falsifier, noun
nonfalsifiable, adjective
unfalsifiable, adjective
unfalsified, adjective


1, 3. See misrepresent. 4. rebut, discredit, refute, confute, controvert.
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World English Dictionary
falsify (ˈfɔːlsɪˌfaɪ)
 
vb , -fies, -fying, -fied
1.  to make (a report, evidence, accounts, etc) false or inaccurate by alteration, esp in order to deceive
2.  to prove false; disprove
 
[C15: from Old French falsifier, from Late Latin falsificāre, from Latin falsusfalse + facere to make]
 
'falsifiable
 
adj
 
falsification
 
n
 
'falsifier
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

falsification
1560s, noun of action from L.L. falsificare (see falsify).

falsify
mid-15c., "to prove false," from Fr. falsifier, from L.L. falsificare, from L. falsificus "making false," from falsus (see false). Related: Falsified; falsifying. Meaning "to make false" is from c.1500.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

falsification fal·si·fi·ca·tion (fôl'sə-fĭ-kā'shən)
n.
The deliberate act of misrepresentation so as to deceive.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Example sentences
The principle of falsification would begin an argument rather than prove a
  point.
Science is not welcoming to all foregrounds, partly because some foregrounds
  are simply invulnerable to scientific falsification.
Empirical falsification of a physical theory also makes little sense at all.
The beauty of science lies in its perpetual subject to refutation and
  falsification.
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