farer

fare

[fair]
noun
1.
the price of conveyance or passage in a bus, train, airplane, or other vehicle.
2.
a person or persons who pay to be conveyed in a vehicle; paying passenger.
3.
a person who hires a public vehicle and its driver.
4.
food; diet: hearty fare.
5.
something offered to the public, for entertainment, enjoyment, consumption, etc.: literary fare.
6.
Archaic. state of things.
verb (used without object), fared, faring.
7.
to experience good or bad fortune, treatment, etc.; get on: He fared well in his profession.
8.
to go; turn out; happen (used impersonally): It fared ill with him.
9.
to go; travel.
10.
to eat and drink: They fared sumptuously.

Origin:
before 1000; Middle English faren, Old English faran; cognate with German fahren, Old Norse fara, Gothic faran; akin to emporium, port5, pram2

farer, noun

fair, far, fare, flare (see synonym study at fair).


4. See food.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
fare (fɛə)
 
n
1.  the sum charged or paid for conveyance in a bus, train, aeroplane, etc
2.  a paying passenger, esp when carried by taxi
3.  a range of food and drink; diet
 
vb (with it as a subject)
4.  to get on (as specified); manage: he fared well
5.  to turn out or happen as specified: it fared badly with him
6.  archaic to eat: we fared sumptuously
7.  archaic (often foll by forth) to go or travel
 
[Old English faran; related to Old Norse fara to travel, Old High German faran to go, Greek poros ford]
 
'farer
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

fare
O.E. fær "journey, road," strong neut. of faran "to journey" (see fare (v.)); merged with faru "journey, expedition, companions, baggage," strong fem. of faran. Original sense is obsolete, except in compounds (wayfarer, sea-faring, etc.) Meaning of "food provided" is
c.1200; that of "conveyance" appears in Scot. early 15c. and led to sense of "payment for passage" (1510s).

fare
O.E. faran "to journey, to make one's way," from P.Gmc. *faranan (cf. Goth. faran, Ger. fahren), from PIE *por- "going, passage," from base *per- "to lead, pass over" (see port (1)). Related: Fared; faring.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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