follow Dictionary.com

How do you spell Hannukah?

fare

[fair] /fɛər/
noun
1.
the price of conveyance or passage in a bus, train, airplane, or other vehicle.
2.
a person or persons who pay to be conveyed in a vehicle; paying passenger.
3.
a person who hires a public vehicle and its driver.
4.
food; diet:
hearty fare.
5.
something offered to the public, for entertainment, enjoyment, consumption, etc.:
literary fare.
6.
Archaic. state of things.
verb (used without object), fared, faring.
7.
to experience good or bad fortune, treatment, etc.; get on:
He fared well in his profession.
8.
to go; turn out; happen (used impersonally):
It fared ill with him.
9.
to go; travel.
10.
to eat and drink:
They fared sumptuously.
Origin
1000
before 1000; Middle English faren, Old English faran; cognate with German fahren, Old Norse fara, Gothic faran; akin to emporium, port5, pram2
Related forms
farer, noun
Can be confused
fair, far, fare.
Synonyms
4. See food.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples from the web for faring
  • The rest of the birds were also weighed, to get a sense of how the flocks were faring.
  • By denying himself and faring more scantily than his neighbours, he secured leisure for pursuits they could not comprehend.
  • Visit this website to find out how wild cats are faring.
  • They may be blooming in your garden, but magnolias are not faring so well in the wild.
  • The cap on each fish type is adjusted yearly by the government according to how the species is faring.
  • Only way we'll ever progress to a space-faring civilization.
  • All the hallmarks of a space faring species negotiating its first steps.
  • With a successful launch, the country would have joined nine other space-faring nations with domestic launch capabilities.
  • What matters is how the couple's generation as a whole is faring relative to the previous generation.
  • But what is clear is that the government is faring poorly.
British Dictionary definitions for faring

fare

/fɛə/
noun
1.
the sum charged or paid for conveyance in a bus, train, aeroplane, etc
2.
a paying passenger, esp when carried by taxi
3.
a range of food and drink; diet
verb (intransitive)
4.
to get on (as specified); manage: he fared well
5.
with it as a subject. to turn out or happen as specified: it fared badly with him
6.
(archaic) to eat: we fared sumptuously
7.
(often foll by forth) (archaic) to go or travel
Derived Forms
farer, noun
Word Origin
Old English faran; related to Old Norse fara to travel, Old High German faran to go, Greek poros ford
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for faring

fare

n.

Old English fær "journey, road, passage, expedition," strong neuter of faran "to journey" (see fare (v.)); merged with faru "journey, expedition, companions, baggage," strong fem. of faran. Original sense is obsolete, except in compounds (wayfarer, sea-faring, etc.) Meaning "food provided" is c.1200; that of "conveyance" appears in Scottish early 15c. and led to sense of "payment for passage" (1510s).

v.

Old English faran "to journey, set forth, go, travel, wander, get on, undergo, make one's way," from Proto-Germanic *faranan (cf. Old Saxon, Old High German, Gothic faran, Old Norse and Old Frisian fara, Dutch varen, German fahren), from PIE *por- "going, passage," from root *per- (2) "to lead, pass over" (see port (n.1)). Related: Fared; faring.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for fare

Most English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for faring

10
12
Scrabble Words With Friends

Quotes with faring