farrow

1 [far-oh]
noun
1.
a litter of pigs.
verb (used with object)
2.
(of swine) to bring forth (young).
verb (used without object)
3.
to produce a litter of pigs.

Origin:
before 900; Middle English farwen to give birth to a litter of pigs, derivative of Old English fearh pig (cognate with Latin porcus); akin to German Ferkel young pig

Dictionary.com Unabridged

farrow

2 [far-oh]
adjective
(of a cow) not pregnant.

Origin:
1485–95; akin to Dutch dialect verwe- (in verwekoe barren cow), Old English fearr ox

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To farrow
Collins
World English Dictionary
farrow1 (ˈfærəʊ)
 
n
1.  a litter of piglets
 
vb
2.  (of a sow) to give birth to (a litter)
 
[Old English fearh; related to Old High German farah young pig, Latin porcus pig, Greek porkos]

farrow2 (ˈfærəʊ)
 
adj
(of a cow) not calving in a given year
 
[C15: from Middle Dutch verwe- (unattested) cow that has ceased to bear; compare Old English fearr ox]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

farrow
O.E. fearh, from P.Gmc. *farkhaz "young pig" (cf. M.L.G. ferken, Du. varken, both dim.), from PIE *porkos- (see pork). Sense of "a litter of pigs" first recorded 1577.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
Farrow wanted to try, but he would be careful to not make the same mistake he had made with himself.
Farrow says the technology could be developed into a whole bodysuit.
Related Words
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature