farsightedness

farsighted

[fahr-sahy-tid, -sahy-tid]
adjective
1.
seeing objects at a distance more clearly than those near at hand; hyperopic.
2.
seeing to a great distance.
3.
wise, as in foreseeing future developments: a farsighted statesman.

Origin:
1635–45; far + sight + -ed3

farsightedly, adverb
farsightedness, noun


3. foresighted, farseeing, prescient, discerning, prudent, perspicacious.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

farsighted
1640s, "forecasting, prescient;" 1878 as a defect of the eyes (hypermetropic); see far + sight. Related: Farsightedness.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

farsighted far·sight·ed or far-sight·ed (fär'sī'tĭd)
adj.

  1. Able to see distant objects better than objects at close range; hyperopic.

  2. Capable of seeing to a great distance.

farsightedness far·sight·ed·ness (fär'sī'tĭd-nĭs)
n.
See hyperopia.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
farsightedness   (fär'sī'tĭd-nĭs)  Pronunciation Key 
See hyperopia.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

farsightedness

refractive error or abnormality in which the cornea and lens of the eye focus the image of the visual field at an imaginary point behind the retina (the light-sensitive layer of tissue lining the back and sides of the eye). The retina thus receives an unfocused image of near objects, though distant objects may be in focus. Hyperopia frequently occurs when an eye is shorter than normal from front to rear; the lens is then unable to increase its convexity sufficiently to focus the images of close objects onto the retina. Corrective lenses for hyperopia are designed to supply the additional convexity needed for focusing. Hyperopic laser in situ keratomileusis (H-LASIK) and photorefractive keratectomy for hyperopia (H-PRK) are common surgical methods that reshape the cornea to improve vision in hyperopic patients.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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