feller

feller

1 [fel-er]

Origin:
1815–25; orig. dial.; by reduction of (ō) to (ə) and merger with words ending in -er

Dictionary.com Unabridged

feller

2 [fel-er]
noun
1.
a person or thing that fells.
2.
Sewing. a person or thing that fells a seam.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English fellere. See fell2, -er1

Feller

[fel-er]
noun
Robert William Andrew ("Bob"; "Bullet Bob") 1918–2010, U.S. baseball player.

fell

3 [fel]
adjective
1.
fierce; cruel; dreadful; savage.
2.
destructive; deadly: fell poison; fell disease.
Idioms
3.
at/in one fell swoop. swoop ( def 5 ).

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English fel < Old French, nominative of felon wicked. See felon

fellness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
fell1 (fɛl)
 
vb
the past tense of fall

fell2 (fɛl)
 
vb
1.  to cut or knock down: to fell a tree; to fell an opponent
2.  needlework to fold under and sew flat (the edges of a seam)
 
n
3.  (US), (Canadian) the timber felled in one season
4.  a seam finished by felling
 
[Old English fellan; related to Old Norse fella, Old High German fellen; see fall]
 
'fellable2
 
adj

fell3 (fɛl)
 
adj
1.  archaic cruel or fierce; terrible
2.  archaic destructive or deadly: a fell disease
3.  one fell swoop a single hasty action or occurrence
 
[C13 fel, from Old French: cruel, from Medieval Latin fellō villain; see felon1]
 
'fellness3
 
n

fell4 (fɛl)
 
n
an animal skin or hide
 
[Old English; related to Old High German fel skin, Old Norse berfjall bearskin, Latin pellis skin; see peel1]

fell5 (fɛl)
 
n
(Northern English), (Scot) (often plural)
 a.  a mountain, hill, or tract of upland moor
 b.  (in combination): fell-walking
 
[C13: from Old Norse fjall; related to Old High German felis rock]

feller1 (ˈfɛlə)
 
n
1.  a person or thing that fells
2.  an attachment on a sewing machine for felling seams

feller2 (ˈfɛlə)
 
n
a nonstandard variant of fellow

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

fell
O.E. fællan, (Mercian) fyllan (W.Saxon) "make fall," also "demolish, kill," from P.Gmc. *fallijanan (cf. O.N. fella, Du. fellen, O.H.G. fellan), causative of *fallan (O.E. feallan, see fall (v.)), showing i-mutation. Related: Felled; feller; felling.

fell
late 13c., from O.Fr. fel "cruel, fierce," from M.L. fello "villain" (see felon). Phrase at one fell swoop is from "Macbeth."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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