feral

1 [feer-uhl, fer-]
adjective
1.
existing in a natural state, as animals or plants; not domesticated or cultivated; wild.
2.
having reverted to the wild state, as from domestication: a pack of feral dogs roaming the woods.
3.
of or characteristic of wild animals; ferocious; brutal.

Origin:
1595–1605; < Medieval Latin, Late Latin ferālis bestial, wild, equivalent to Latin fer(a) wild beast + -ālis -al1

Dictionary.com Unabridged

feral

2 [feer-uhl, fer-]
adjective
1.
causing death; fatal.
2.
funereal; gloomy.

Origin:
1615–25; < Latin fērālis of the dead, funerary, fatal

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To feral
Collins
World English Dictionary
feral1 (ˈfɪərəl, ˈfɛr-)
 
adj
1.  Also: ferine (of animals and plants) existing in a wild or uncultivated state, esp after being domestic or cultivated
2.  Also: ferine savage; brutal
3.  derogatory, slang (Austral) (of a person) tending to be interested in environmental issues and having a rugged, unkempt appearance
 
n
4.  derogatory, slang (Austral) a person who displays such tendencies and appearance
5.  slang (Austral) disgusting
6.  slang (Austral) excellent
 
[C17: from Medieval Latin ferālis, from Latin fera a wild beast, from ferus savage]
 
ferity1
 
n

feral2 (ˈfɪərəl, ˈfɛr-)
 
adj
1.  astrology associated with death
2.  gloomy; funereal
 
[C17: from Latin fērālis relating to corpses; perhaps related to ferre to carry]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

feral
c.1600, from M.Fr. feral "wild," from L. fera, in phrase fera bestia "wild beast," from ferus "wild" (see fierce).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
American Heritage
Science Dictionary
feral   (fîr'əl, fěr'-)  Pronunciation Key 
Existing in a wild or untamed state, either naturally or having returned to such a state from domestication.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
Cite This Source
Example sentences
In time, he was able to domesticate some feral cats, who served as companions
  and exterminators.
Some are wild, feral cats, whereas others are family pets that were let out of
  their homes at night.
These feral cats are slim, with long legs and tails, and have been recognized
  as a distinct breed.
His profile is vaguely feral, in a way that makes him look menacing without
  making him ugly.
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature