ferocious

[fuh-roh-shuhs]
adjective
1.
savagely fierce, as a wild beast, person, action, or aspect; violently cruel: a ferocious beating.
2.
extreme or intense: a ferocious thirst.

Origin:
1640–50; < Latin ferōc-, stem of ferōx savage, fierce (fer(us) wild (see feral1, fierce) + -ōx having such an appearance; akin to -opsis) + -ious

ferociously, adverb
ferociousness, noun
nonferocious, adjective
nonferociously, adverb
nonferociousness, noun
unferocious, adjective
unferociously, adverb


1. rapacious. See fierce.
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World English Dictionary
ferocious (fəˈrəʊʃəs)
 
adj
savagely fierce or cruel: a ferocious tiger; a ferocious argument
 
[C17: from Latin ferox fierce, untamable, warlike]
 
fe'rociously
 
adv
 
ferocity
 
n
 
fe'rociousness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

ferocious
1640s, from L. ferocis, oblique case of ferox "fierce, wild-looking" (see ferocity). Related: Ferociously.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Kudzu, the ferocious invasive vine, has wrestled some now-deserted
  neighborhoods to the ground.
What it wants is an explanation, which you feel will free you in some way-if
  only from the grip of your ferocious waiting.
When another scientist then challenges the hypothesis, they can be pretty
  ferocious in their reactions.
Again, the ferocious rhetoric belies the mundane reality.
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