ferocious

[fuh-roh-shuhs]
adjective
1.
savagely fierce, as a wild beast, person, action, or aspect; violently cruel: a ferocious beating.
2.
extreme or intense: a ferocious thirst.

Origin:
1640–50; < Latin ferōc-, stem of ferōx savage, fierce (fer(us) wild (see feral1, fierce) + -ōx having such an appearance; akin to -opsis) + -ious

ferociously, adverb
ferociousness, noun
nonferocious, adjective
nonferociously, adverb
nonferociousness, noun
unferocious, adjective
unferociously, adverb


1. rapacious. See fierce.
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World English Dictionary
ferocious (fəˈrəʊʃəs)
 
adj
savagely fierce or cruel: a ferocious tiger; a ferocious argument
 
[C17: from Latin ferox fierce, untamable, warlike]
 
fe'rociously
 
adv
 
ferocity
 
n
 
fe'rociousness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

ferocious
1640s, from L. ferocis, oblique case of ferox "fierce, wild-looking" (see ferocity). Related: Ferociously.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
During his first year or so of life he fights for bodily nutriment, almost
  ferociously.
Society punished it ferociously and justly, in self-defence.
They are the only snakes in the world that build nests for their eggs, which
  they guard ferociously until the hatchlings emerge.
When matched with a new lobster, he fought ferociously.
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