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fester

[fes-ter] /ˈfɛs tər/
verb (used without object)
1.
to form pus; generate purulent matter; suppurate.
2.
to cause ulceration, as a foreign body in the flesh.
3.
to putrefy or rot.
4.
to rankle, as a feeling of resentment.
verb (used with object)
5.
to cause to rankle:
Malice festered his spirit.
noun
6.
an ulcer; a rankling sore.
7.
a small, purulent, superficial sore.
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; (noun) Middle English festir, festre < Anglo-French, Old French festre < Latin fistula fistula (for -l- > -r- cf. chapter); (v.) Middle English festryn, derivative of the noun or < Old French festrir
Related forms
unfestered, adjective
unfestering, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for festering
  • Surgeons reopened her incision and discovered a festering infection that had caused extensive damage.
  • Every coin has its other side, every virtue its corresponding vice-and practically every university its festering sores.
  • Since then, a raft of bilateral issues has been festering.
  • It's a mountain of festering refuse, a half-hour hike across, emitting clouds of smoke from subterranean fires.
  • She offers no festering family secrets, no deathbed revelations.
  • festering grievances and conflicts must be taken seriously, and the people given recourse.
  • His conviction and failed appeals in that case had led him to harbor a long-festering resentment of the court system.
  • The problem of academic dishonesty is festering on campuses across the nation.
  • By now, we're all painfully familiar with the long-festering problems that caused a spate of high-profile corporate failures.
  • Our eyes have been opened to festering issues that have for too long been swept aside or dealt with ineffectively.
British Dictionary definitions for festering

fester

/ˈfɛstə/
verb
1.
to form or cause to form pus
2.
(intransitive) to become rotten; decay
3.
to become or cause to become bitter, irritated, etc, esp over a long period of time; rankle: resentment festered his imagination
4.
(intransitive) (informal) to be idle or inactive
noun
5.
a small ulcer or sore containing pus
Word Origin
C13: from Old French festre suppurating sore, from Latin: fistula
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for festering

fester

v.

late 14c., from Old French festre "small sore discharging pus," from Latin fistula "pipe, ulcer" (see fistula). The noun is from c.1300. Related: Festered; festering.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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festering in Medicine

fester fes·ter (fěs'tər)
v. fes·tered, fes·ter·ing, fes·ters

  1. To ulcerate.

  2. To form pus; putrefy.

n.
An ulcer.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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