fester

[fes-ter]
verb (used without object)
1.
to form pus; generate purulent matter; suppurate.
2.
to cause ulceration, as a foreign body in the flesh.
3.
to putrefy or rot.
4.
to rankle, as a feeling of resentment.
verb (used with object)
5.
to cause to rankle: Malice festered his spirit.
noun
6.
an ulcer; a rankling sore.
7.
a small, purulent, superficial sore.

Origin:
1350–1400; (noun) Middle English festir, festre < Anglo-French, Old French festre < Latin fistula fistula (for -l- > -r- cf. chapter); (v.) Middle English festryn, derivative of the noun or < Old French festrir

unfestered, adjective
unfestering, adjective
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World English Dictionary
fester (ˈfɛstə)
 
vb
1.  to form or cause to form pus
2.  (intr) to become rotten; decay
3.  to become or cause to become bitter, irritated, etc, esp over a long period of time; rankle: resentment festered his imagination
4.  informal (intr) to be idle or inactive
 
n
5.  a small ulcer or sore containing pus
 
[C13: from Old French festre suppurating sore, from Latin: fistula]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

fester
late 14c., from O.Fr. festre, from L. fistula "pipe, ulcer" (see fistula). The noun is from c.1300. Related: Festered; festering.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

fester fes·ter (fěs'tər)
v. fes·tered, fes·ter·ing, fes·ters

  1. To ulcerate.

  2. To form pus; putrefy.

n.
An ulcer.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Example sentences
Surgeons reopened her incision and discovered a festering infection that had caused extensive damage.
Every coin has its other side, every virtue its corresponding vice-and practically every university its festering sores.
It's a mountain of festering refuse, a half-hour hike across, emitting clouds of smoke from subterranean fires.
She offers no festering family secrets, no deathbed revelations.
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