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fidus Achates

/ˈfaɪdəs əˈkeɪtiːz/
noun
1.
a faithful friend or companion
Word Origin
Latin, literally: faithful Achates, the name of the faithful companion of Aeneas in Virgil's Aeneid
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Examples from the Web for fidus achates
Historical Examples
  • Hurd is now chiefly known as the devoted friend—or rather the 'fidus achates'—of Warburton.

    The English Church in the Eighteenth Century Charles J. Abbey and John H. Overton
  • She layed all her snares for Dr Lewis, who is the fidus achates of my uncle.

  • Bugs was for the moment Harry's fidus achates; a sort of vice-James.

    The Whirligig of Time Wayland Wells Williams
  • He came, after sundry messages had been sent after him, and with him his fidus achates.

  • Deschenaux, his fidus achates, was a cobbler's son, whom experience alone had educated and fate and unscrupulousness had advanced.

    Old Quebec Sir Gilbert Parker and Claude Glennon Bryan
  • Poor N., you had but one timorous supporter, even me, so early your fidus achates—but one against so many.

    The Book-Bills of Narcissus Le Gallienne, Richard
  • Isabella was attended and consoled in her retirement by her faithful servant Transita, her "fidus achates."

    An Old Sailor's Yarns Nathaniel Ames
  • He had a potential voice in the internal economy of the village, and was often the fidus achates of the patel (village official).

  • A greater difficulty was involved in the fact that the Bibliotaph had many socii, but no fidus achates.

    The Bibliotaph Leon H. Vincent
  • I shall be very glad of it, and promise to be his fidus achates in every sense, for the public as well as his own service.

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